Research Projects

Development of an HPV vaccine and cervical cancer screening provider intervention
Funding Source: National Cancer Institute
Project Summary: Despite increases in cervical cancer screening in the past few decades, African American and Hispanic women have substantially higher rates of cervical cancer incidence and mortality than White women. We propose to examine the association between receipt of the HPV vaccine in daughters and subsequent HPV prevention practices and cervical cancer screening in mothers and daughters. We hypothesize that women and their daughters may be less likely to use HPV preventive measures and to be screened appropriately for cervical cancer if the daughters are vaccinated against HPV. The specific aims of the proposed community-based participatory research (CBPR) project are: 1) to develop a culturally-tailored provider intervention to increase uptake of the HPV vaccine among African American and Hispanic adolescents aged 9-18 years while encouraging appropriate HPV prevention practices and cervical cancer screening, 2) to deliver a culturally-tailored provider intervention to increase uptake of the HPV vaccine among African American and Hispanic adolescents aged 9-18 years while encouraging appropriate HPV prevention practices and cervical cancer screening, and 3) to evaluate the extent to which a provider intervention that encourages parents to have their daughters vaccinated against HPV results in HPV vaccination of the daughters and impacts subsequent HPV prevention practices and cervical cancer screening of the women and their daughters. This CBPR is a collaboration between Meharry Medical College, Vanderbilt University (VU), three community health centers in Nashville, Memphis and Chattanooga, and a Community Advisory Board (CAB). The academic and community partners will collaboratively develop a provider intervention, which will be delivered to parents/patients at the three community health centers and at Meharry to encourage receipt of the HPV vaccine, and continued HPV prevention practices and cervical cancer screening in African Americans and Hispanics.


 

Knowledge, attitudes, and practices among African Americans for Biospecimen Collection
Funding Source: National Cancer Institute
Project Summary: Human bio-specimens are an invaluable resource for addressing cancers and other chronic diseases. Molecular and genetic studies of the bio-specimens contained in these biobanks can provide groundbreaking information about the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of these disease entities. African Americans are underrepresented in biobanks, are less likely to donate bio-specimens, and less likely to participate in clinical research. This is problematic because African Americans frequently experience a greater incidence and mortality for many types of cancers. The primary goal of this project is to assess and improve the knowledge, attitudes, and behavioral intent of the African American community with regard to donating bio-specimens for cancer research.